Confessions of an Oversaver

Financial paranoia seems like a good problem to have, but it’s still a problem

Devon Price
Human Parts

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Illustration: Richard A. Chance

Content warning: Very brief mention of disordered eating and sexual and domestic violence.

InIn about a month and a half, my partner and I are moving to a new apartment. The new apartment meets all my requirements: rent is less than 33 percent of my monthly income, it’s in the right location, it has the amenities we need, it looks nice. For the neighborhood, it’s a better-than-average deal.

But it’s $300 more per month than our current rent. And I’m panicking.

I know I can make it work. I know how much money I squirrel away each month. I know that in addition to my full-time job, I supplement my income with consulting and Medium revenue, I know that I’ve told my partner he needs to contribute to household finances far more significantly than he has in the past. But I’m panicking.

I know we need to move out of the tiny disintegrating apartment we’ve been living in for two years. I can admit at this point that we never should have moved there in the first place; it was always too crumbling, too small. I know a new apartment will give me the space to work from home in peace and allow us to actually have guests over for dinner. But I’m panicking.

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Devon Price
Human Parts

He/Him or It/Its. Social Psychologist & Author of LAZINESS DOES NOT EXIST and UNMASKING AUTISM. Links to buy: https://linktr.ee/drdevonprice