Humans 101

This Is How You Rest

In the delicate space between work and play

Sophie Lucido Johnson
Human Parts
Published in
7 min readJun 28, 2022

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Illustration by the author.

The longest day of the year has come and gone. Personally, I’m a fan of the winter solstice, because I like to say the sentence, “From here on out, we get a little more light every day until it’s summer.” Now it is summer. We’ve reached the summit, and from here, we begin to mosey back on down.

The days are long and languid. Or, they’re long; and they have the POTENTIAL, in their length, to also adopt an amount of lanuidness. (Languidity? Whatever, spell check doesn’t like either one.) I’ve been giving some thought to the idea of rest. It isn’t something I’ve been doing much of lately, and I’m aware of that partially because at the beginning of the pandemic, I did a fair amount of it, and by extension, I learned what it was. I know that I should have known by then, but I didn’t.

Now, I’m using the word “rest” in a highly specific way.

Here is a list of what “rest,” by this specific definition is not:

  • It is not sleeping. Sleeping is sleeping. Yes, technically and scientifically, sleeping is the most fundamental form of physical rest, and that’s great, and people should sleep as much as their bodies want. I’m all about sleep. But we have a word for…

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Sophie Lucido Johnson
Human Parts

A person who writes and draws and eats her feelings.