Who Are You? I Don’t Know. It Seems I Have so Many Identities to tell

But too many identities make me feel like I have no identity at all

Wahyuni Sapri
Human Parts
Published in
5 min readAug 17, 2023

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Who Are You? I Don’t Know. It Seems I Have so Many Identities to tell
Photo by Jacek Dylag on Unsplash

Who are you? I’m just I am.

But in the real world, this answer seems not considered valid. So what is the correct answer they expect? Tell them your name and continue with your profession. Are you a doctor? Are you a writer? Are you an engineer?

I always wonder why our occupation should be the most mentioned as self-identity. That is just the way we earn to survive. Who are you? I don’t know. It seems I have so many identities to tell. But too many identities make me feel like I have no identity at all.

The concept of identity encompasses a vast expanse. Even your name is a mere linguistic tool to summon your presence.

When I was a kid, some friends made fun of me because my parents came from different cities, even though we were still from the same country.

Sometimes the neighbors address my parents as “Mr.” and “Mrs.” followed by the name of the city they came from, which I find rude and inappropriate. Our ethnicity doesn’t define us as individuals, although it can influence external and physical aspects that contribute to our appearance.

A sense of belonging can extend beyond just one place, group, or community. I’m a food lover. I’m a person who has less social energy, but I love to observe people. I’m a child to my parents and a young sister to my siblings. I’m a niece, grandchild, and a friend to some people.

I did multiple things at work, so I’m not sure how to label myself about it. And I don’t think that my work can label my complexity of selfhood. Sometimes, when I look at different people’s social profiles, I see their bios say things like “dreamer,” “learner,” “heliophile,” “pluviophile,” “xenophile,” and lots of other cool words. However, the labels we choose for ourselves are like tiny puzzle pieces, capturing only a small part of who we truly are. However, self-identity for me is the most complex phenomenon ever: ourselves, the self. At the end of the day, we all are just ordinary humans.

I’ve experienced past trauma that led me to build a strong barrier between myself and others…

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Wahyuni Sapri
Human Parts

Nuance writer. Degree in chemistry. Delve more into food science for the next level. But also into human behavior and learning neuroscience in my free time.